Who Owns the Video Player Platform Odysee?

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Written by: Alex Popa

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Who Owns the Video Player Platform Odysee?

Odysee, the blockchain-based video player platform, is owned by the creators of the LBRY blockchain, Jeremy Kauffman and Jimmy Kiselak.

Later on, the two CEOs were joined by co-founders Mike Vine, Josh Finer, and Alex Grintsvayg. Kauffman is the Chief Executive Officer, Grintsvayg is the Chief Technology Officer, and Finer is the Director of Operations and Analytics.

LBRY is an independent, trustless, decentralized blockchain for storing videos and pictures that can never be deleted.

Odysee is not a non-profit organization. It functions on the LBRY Credits, which are the crypto tokens of the LBRY network.

Keep reading for more information on Odysee!

Who Owns the Video Player Platform Odysee?

Is Odysee Reliable?

In short, Odysee operates a distributed, traceable and transparent network that is encrypted using cryptographic algorithms specific to the blockchain.

No one can stop you from uploading a video on the LBRY blockchain through Odysee. Not even the Odysee creators themselves.

Regarding reliability, Odysee seems highly trustworthy, and you should have no problems using it to house your videos that might get restricted on YouTube.

Many YouTubers have come to Odysee to publish their videos in case YouTube decides to demonetize or remove their videos.

The nice thing about Odysee is that it stays there forever once you upload something on it. That’s because the content is uploaded on the LBRY blockchain.

And as you may know, no one can modify or delete something on the Blockchain. The records are inerasable and permanent.

Does Google Own LBRY?

Nope, Google does now own LBRY or Odysee. While Odysee “was” owned by Google at some point, the LBRY team did not buy it from them.

It was resold in the meantime, and LBRY bought it from someone else. Either way, neither LBRY nor Odysee have anything to do with Google.

Official LBRY Tweet
Official LBRY Tweet

As you can see, this is the official LBRY Tweeter account. They’re saying Google has nothing to do with LBRY or Odysee.

They “don’t like Google” either. So, they likely have no intention to work with them or sell Odysee to them in the future.

Conclusion

To summarize, Odysee is owned by the creators of LBRY, a decentralized blockchain network. It’s not owned by Google or anything like that.

The LBRY founders purchased Odysee from someone else and repurposed it for what they wanted for the company.

Odysee works in tandem with LBRY because any video you upload to Odysee is also uploaded to the LBRY blockchain.

If you have any questions, comment below, and I’ll reply as soon as possible!

How do I get credits on Odysee?

When you post a video on Odysee, you pay a symbolic sum of money in LBRY Credits. You can set up the dollar equivalent.

You’re essentially staking that money for your publish claim. If you want to delete the video in the future, you’ll gain that money back.

To get additional credits on Odysee, you’ll need to rely on your viewers. They can donate credits to every video.

For every view, you also get a certain amount of LBRY Credits. You also won’t have to deal with credit card processing fees.

Alternatively, you can buy LBRY Credits if you want to have them on hand when you need them.

You can buy LBRY Credits on large cryptocurrency platforms like Bittrex. Then, transfer them to your Odysee account.

And then you can stake more credits on every video you upload.

Does Odysee have an app?

Yes, it does.

You can download an app for Android and iOS from Google Play or the App Store.

It functions and looks the same as the desktop version of Odysee, only that it’s adapted to mobile screens.

You can do pretty much all the things you can do on desktop computers. You can also upload videos and post them on Odysee.

Based on user feedback and my tests, the app runs smoothly and has no errors or glitches.

Moreover, the performance is top-notch on most OS systems and mobile devices. I haven’t seen any user complaining about browsing speed.

You might have some issues with buffering, but it’s likely not because of the app itself but because of your device.

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Alex Popa

My name is Alex and I have a knack for social media in all its shapes and forms. I’ve dealt with such things for quite some time and I noticed that many people have issues with social media and technicalities.

Unforeseen errors, bugs, and other problems make their use of social media problematic. These things will be discussed amply in the guides on Whizcase.

I'll present the facts as they are, and offer quick and easy solutions for them.

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